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War Study (Part 2)

Here we are in Genesis 3, and God has come to commune with Adam & Eve.  Isn’t it interesting that while Satan wasn’t the one for whom God came calling, he was still present to hear his punishment (the part of the curse that was specifically addressed to him)? Scripture doesn’t say this, of course, but I’m of the opinion that there were probably two things going on in that situation. The first is that he couldn’t just walk away & leave God’s presence without being dismissed to do so.  As we’ll see in this next installment, Scripture makes it evident that everyone, even Satan, answers to God. The second thought I had was that Satan is so mean & hateful that he probably wanted to watch it all go down. I think he hoped to see horror & disappointment on God’s face when He discovered that Satan had convinced His prized creation to disobey HimThat’s all total speculation on my part, of course, but haven’t you ever wondered why he hung around?  Typically, when someone instigates trouble, they disappear and leave the other person holding the bag if/when it’s been discovered.  Yet, the serpent is there in verses 14 & 15 when God addresses him.

Adam & Eve were kicked out of the garden. We’re not told exactly in this passage where Satan was sent. However, as we’ll see in the following portion of our study, other places in scripture tell us that he’s roaming the earth.  Since our enemy occupies the same living space that we do, we are wise to continue to study his methods and maneuvers so that we can learn to recognize his actions and how to distinguish his voice that causes us to question God in hard times. When we can recognize that we’re under attack, we can fight back.

  • Given that his first appearance in Scripture finds our enemy seeking to separate man from God, what conclusion can we draw about his purposes? His methodology? His position before God? 
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What does he have to say for himself?

  • The most ideal strategy for dealing with an enemy is to get a copy of their battle plan or their strategy. In Isaiah 14, we get a brief glimpse of the enemy’s ultimate goal. Read Isaiah 14:12-14.  Five times, Satan says, “I will…”  What is it that he declares that he’s going to do? And what is the underlying theme that runs through all of these declarations?
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  • Now, Read Isaiah 14:15-23…how’s that plan working out for him?
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Poetic Insights…

  • The Book of Job is the first of the 5 books of poetry in the Old Testament. While it is classified as Hebrew poetry, the message within it is still a non-fiction account of the life of a real person. Within the beginning of this story, we find some very specific information about the workings of our enemy as well as the dynamic between him and God. This is once again something that is familiar to you, but this time as you observe, take note of how the enemy works in the story rather than focusing on the patience & longsuffering of our righteous friend, Job, as we often do.
  • Read Job 1:6-12
    Pay attention to who is accountable to whom.  Who initiates the discussion of Job?  Who has control? What do you think about the sentence where God says, “…all that he[Job] hath is in thy [Satan’s] power..”
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  • Read Job 2:1-7
    Look especially at verse 3 where it says, “…although thou [Satan] movedst me [God] against him [Job], to destroy him [Job] without cause.”  Think about your previous answer regarding who has control and God putting all the Job had into Satan’s power.  What does this tell you about the power dynamic in the spiritual realm? Why does this work in favor of the child of God? 
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You’re not “lion”…

  • 1 Peter 5:8-9 warns the Christian to be sober & vigilant because our enemy “as a roaring lion, walketh about, seeking whom he may devour.” 
  • I studied lions to gain better understanding of this passage, and learned that lions basically roar for one of 2 reasons:
  • 1. Territory – if another lion is encroaching or even coming close to a lion’s established territory, the territorial lion will let out a series of roars to let it be known and warn the other lion to leave. 
  • 2. Fear Tactic – Most of the prey that lions pursue are capable of far greater speed than the lion itself. So a hunting lion will hide in the tall grass & wait for the opportunity. When the unsuspecting wildebeest or gazelle wanders too close to that spot, the lion pounces with that loud, stunning, frightening, roar.  The roar incites panic & the stunned prey isn’t as quick to respond as it, otherwise, would’ve been capable of doing. 
  • When lions hunt, they normally position themselves between their prey and the nearest “watering hole.” 
  • Lions don’t specifically target weak or injured prey; however, that may make them more susceptible due to their lack of speed. Lions are looking to cover the least area of distance (because they lack the speed), so ultimately, the most susceptible prey are the ones that come closest to where the lion is hiding/waiting. 
  • When a lion has been “found” or discovered by a field of gazelles, the gazelles will all just stand still and stare at it. The lion loses the element of surprise and becomes powerless. It won’t attack. They’re all aware of the lion’s presence and watching its every move; and they have the ability to leave the lion in the dust when they are aware and on guard. 

Read 1 Peter 5:8-9. Think about the implications of everything you just learned about lions. Relate it to what is being said in this passage. What does this tell you about our enemy?
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